Admissions

Career College Central Summary:

  • Many people imagine a bright line between college and vocational education — Ph.Ds on one side, plumbers on the other. That line doesn't exist, and it hasn't for at least a generation. Particularly at two-year colleges, programs for future English majors and future auto mechanics often exist side-by-side. One path might lead to an associate degree, the other to a certificate, but they're both at a place called "college....
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Career College Central Summary:

  • Echo boomers are different from their parents and have different expectations. According to survey research, echo boomers are more interested in doing work that helps others than they are in making money. They demand mentorship and expect a high-tech fast-moving workplace. They desire flexibility and fair treatment. Compared with their parents, echo boomers have been exposed to more technology-enhanced learning, have experienced a greater...
Posted in: Admissions, Admissions

Career College Central summary:

  • The open-door admissions policies of community colleges and the national college completion “agenda” are contributing to an influx of unprepared students who have little chance of earning a degree, and who are likely to rack up crippling debt along the way.
  • That’s the central argument of a newly released book, Community Colleges and the Access Effect: Why Open Admissions Suppresses Achievement...
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Career College Central summary:

  • As certain high school seniors work meticulously this month to finish their early applications to colleges, some may not realize that comments they casually make online could negatively affect their prospects. In fact, new research from Kaplan Test Prep, the service owned by the Washington Post Company, suggests that online scrutiny of college hopefuls is growing.
  • Of 381 college admissions officers who answered a Kaplan telephone...
Posted in: Admissions, Admissions

TRENTON N.J.—New Jersey lawmakers approved a bill Monday that would allow those in the country illegally to qualify for in-state tuition rates at state colleges and universities.

Dozens of students and supporters packed the state Assembly Budget Committee to argue the measure would allow for those here illegally to qualify for an affordable higher education.

If it becomes law, the measure would take effect in the fall semester. It also allows for community colleges to...