Admissions

Posted in: Admissions, Admissions

Career College Central summary:

  • As certain high school seniors work meticulously this month to finish their early applications to colleges, some may not realize that comments they casually make online could negatively affect their prospects. In fact, new research from Kaplan Test Prep, the service owned by the Washington Post Company, suggests that online scrutiny of college hopefuls is growing.
  • Of 381 college admissions officers who answered a Kaplan telephone...
Posted in: Admissions, Admissions

TRENTON N.J.—New Jersey lawmakers approved a bill Monday that would allow those in the country illegally to qualify for in-state tuition rates at state colleges and universities.

Dozens of students and supporters packed the state Assembly Budget Committee to argue the measure would allow for those here illegally to qualify for an affordable higher education.

If it becomes law, the measure would take effect in the fall semester. It also allows for community colleges to...

Enrollment in California's community colleges has plunged to a 20-year low as budget-strapped campuses have had to slash classes and instructors, according to a report released Monday.

Course offerings are at a 15-year low, dropping 21% from 2007-08 to 2011-12, with music and dance, education and business programs particularly hard hit.

The report, published by the Public Policy Institute of California, charts a system staggering under the weight of unprecedented funding...

Legislation that would allow some 100-percent disabled veterans and their immediate family members to receive a tuition-free higher education was approved today in a budget subcommittee of the Oklahoma House of Representatives.

Senate Bill 486, by state Sen. Frank Simpson and state Rep. Pat Ownbey, would allow 100-percent disabled veterans injured after the Sept. 11, 2001 attack and their families to attend any state-supported technology center school or any state higher education...

VIRGINIA M. ROMETTY, the chief executive of I.B.M., recently urged her employees to take 40 hours of continuing education this year. The company would not reimburse tuition, but would pay for expenses, like textbooks.

The offer inspired Todd Watson, an I.B.M. executive in Austin, Tex., to update his knowledge of corporate finance. But who needs tuition? Instead, he signed up for a free finance class created by the prestigious University of Michigan and offered by a start-up called...