Bits and Pieces

Why follow all the higher education opinion writers when we can do it for you? Save yourself the time of surfing the Web for the latest blog commentaries and opinion pieces. You’ll find excerpts from recent posts and links to those pieces here. Whether you agree or disagree with these thoughts, this is your connection to what’s being said about career colleges and higher education in general.

A Radical Solution For America’s Worsening College Tuition Bubble

“The best thing federal policymakers can do is help colleges hit rock bottom as quickly as possible, before the opportunity for recovery is lost.”
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"Change.edu": 3 Pros and 3 Cons
“For-profit higher ed evangelists, agnostics, and critics should all read Change.edu. If you are inclined to see for-profit higher ed as a positive force for innovation in post-secondary education (as I am), then you will find much to like in Rosen's argument for the place of proprietary institutions in the higher ed ecosystem. If you are a critic of for-profit institutions, then reading Rosen is a great way to get to know your enemy. If you remain undecided if the growth of for-profit universities represents a positive or negative development, then Change.edu will give you a range of arguments and data points to ponder.”
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Guest Post: Ed Dept's State Authorization Rule Does More Harm than Good
“ … the Education Department put into effect a ‘state authorization’ regulation that basically reiterates what’s already in the law: that online schools must obtain a license from states in which students are being enrolled to benefit from federal financial aid. Issuing a regulation that simply repeats the existing Higher Education Act requirement is counterproductive -- as it suggests that the statute, by itself, does not already include this mandate.”
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Opinion: Students, the New Cash Cows
“Colleges and universities have always charged some students more than others – that's what financial aid is all about. But the growth of for-profit higher education, combined with pressures on state universities to raise more of their own revenue, is intensifying the competition for the students who will pay the most up front.”
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A Response to Concerns Regarding Student Debt Levels Raised by Occupy Wall Street Protesters
“The Obama administration presumably is attentively listening to media accounts of these protesters. In late October, President Obama announced he would use his executive authority powers to expand the income based repayment program. With the upcoming Presidential election, I expect substantial policy discussions regarding mechanisms to help students pay down their debt burden. Following the rash of government bail outs of many sectors in our economy, I'm curious as to the degree that policymakers contemplate rolling out student loan forgiveness programs.”
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